Tuesday, 27 May 2014

No 11095, Tuesday 27 May 2014, Gridman


Lot of googling done today. Too many CD's etc (50%) for my liking.


ACROSS
1   Relating to bookseller getting torn holy work, Goddess, to short force (11) BIBLIOPOLIC {BIBLe}{I}O{POLICe} Thanks to Google
9   One with many a pupil looking up to (7) TEACHER [CD]
10 Be inquiring ones without small vessels (7) BEAKERS {BE}{AsKERS}
11 W.W. Air Force General 10 losing sides (5) EAKER bEAKERs
12 One’s admission of having consulted a dictionary (1,6,2) I LOOKED UP  for plenty of answers today [CD]
13 Excel in al fresco? (5) OUTDO (~outdoor)
15 With pupils, they are bound for school (9) NOTEBOOKS [C&DD]
18 Maintain assent to Puducherry’s extreme skill of ball-juggling (5-4) KEEPY-UPPY {KEEP}{Y UP}{PuducherrY} Thanks to Google

21 Board tinge marred (3,2) GET IN*
22 Singer to get wild acknowledgements (9) GREETINGS* Was confused by the 'to' in between
24 Dance with redhead moving in darkness (5) UMBRA (-r)UMB(+r)RA
26 Angering endlessly one music composer (7) ROSSINI {cROSSINg}{1}
27 Endure while transiting the subway? (7) UNDERGO {UNDER-GO}
28 What Gridman, not equal to writing a clue, might say (3,6,2) IT'S BEYOND ME [CD]

DOWN
1   Following all rules, purchase guide, we are told (2,3,4) BY THE BOOK (~buy the book)
2   Ravenous? (5) BLACK [CD] Like logic 'All ravens are black, so anything black is ravenous' :-)
3   On the same page, musically (2,7) IN HARMONY [C&DD]
4   Shakespearean woman without a working share (7) PORTION {PORTIa}{ON}
5   As worn by the researcher in the science room (3,4) LAB COAT [CD]
6   The sort of talk that is a lesson (5) CHALK [CD]
7   Gives credit to dunce hoarding objects (5,3) LENDS OUT {L{ENDS} OUT}
8   Inviter's initial request? (1,1,1,1) R.S.V.P. [CD]
14 What a reserved person would say (3,5) THE LEAST [CD]
16 A TV nut is said to … … … the screen (2,5,2) BE GLUED TO
17 What the reprimanding music teacher did to the learner (4,1,4) SENT A NOTE [CD]
19 Puts in tentatively: Beams (7) PENCILS [DD]
20 A certain affirmation? (3,4) YES SURE [CD]
22 In R.K. Narayan’s title he is ‘’reluctant’’ (4) GURU [GK] Thanks to Google again
                                                                                        Cartoon by Bhargav
23 Endless twin kit for Buck Rogers’ robot pal (5) TWIKI {TWIn}{KIt... and again
25 Said directors are in a sick and tried state (5) BORED (~board)

90 comments:

  1. Deepak
    The preamble is a fair comment. Yesterday while I was reviewing I too felt that many clues seemed to be rather non-cryptic. And you have said it! Sometimes the gridfills happen to be such that it is perhaps difficult to impart cryptic element.

    ReplyDelete
  2. An afterthought
    Deepak, Did you mean that many clues, though following the cryptic element, had to be googled to ensure that the words/phrases - being strange - were correct?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't have any doubt abut the words/phrases being correct. I had to google to verify if I had got it right.

      Delete
    2. I'm curious to know how the gridfills happened with this one to end up with so many non-standard phrases. I could not find any of these answers in my Chambers and ODE : I LOOKED UP, IT'S BEYOND ME, LENDS OUT, SENT A NOTE, YES SURE.

      I can understand certain clue types being skewed in a puzzle. I don't have a problem with CD clues, but here I found it hard to both solve/guess the answer and not be able to validate it against a dictionary.

      Delete
    3. Thanks for this observation, Bhavan. But, frankly, I am unable to say now how it happened.
      But I don't agree that all of those you mention are 'non-standard' phrases. And I don't agree that the phrases in a grid must be those that are recorded in a dictionary.
      I LOOKED UP may be way-out.
      But the others are phrases that might occur naturally in everyday speech. Why, even I LOOKED UP may be used by someone in conversation.
      What do others think? Are these phrases that should not find a place in a crossword grid?

      Delete
    4. I looked up as you mentioned CV is a trifle vague, if I may make an understatement. Its beyond me and sent a note are fine and fit in well with the definitions too. Yes sure is acceptable. I know that people lend, not sure if they lend out. Doesn't sound right somehow.

      Delete
    5. Why not? Any new phrase, in contemporary use, is welcome ! That's the way of improving one's crossword solving ability. I have added so many new words and phrases in my Norman Pulsford, which is now 30 years old !. I haven't come across a reprint edition since then. I keep getting new phrases still and I have run out of space in the pages. So, I jot down in a separate notebook now. Keep it up, Gridman !!

      Delete
    6. I am okay with words or phrases in use even if they are not in a dictionary. For example, the phrase "Do not disturb" is common on hotel doors and also in the current telephone usage. My search in Chambers did not yield it, though I might have looked in the wrong place. I am ok with that phrase.

      Delete
  3. Any resemblance to any person in B's cartoon is a coincidence (?). Reluctant? Not at all ... BTW today's TH report has a para listing the people occupying the first row. A glaring error in that list...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Tough going today. Too many CDs. I could get 28 Across alright but that's what/how I felt while solving this CW.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I didn't like the banner headline
    MODI NOW INDIA'S 15th PM
    1. Do they mean to say the othr day he was a chaiwallah, now he is ...
    or
    2.We really didn't want him to be 15th PM but now he is ...
    or
    3. Long ago he should have been a PM but there had to be 14 PMs before he became one
    or
    4. He was forever trying to be and now, at last he is...

    I do understand that because of 24 hrs TV news, it's rather difficult to give an apt banner headline in the next day's paper, but TH could have done better,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CV: your pulchritude is remarkable ! I see some glaring bloomers in the streamers in the TV news ! Who cares a rap(e) ?!!

      Delete
  6. Can anyone except Nadathur or Venkatesh give the names of 14 previous PMs? No googling prior to the post here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would have tried but I had just googled it.

      Delete
    2. I had to google as I could recall only 12 names

      Delete
    3. Be frank and record here how many you could name without Googling

      Delete
    4. JN, GN, LBS, IG, MD, CS, DG, ABV, CSh, VPS, RG, MMS,

      is all I could recall, including acting, I think. Geographically, DG is close to heart !

      Delete
    5. Missed only IKG. GN had two stints as per Google, so only 13 persons have occupied the chair.

      Delete
    6. On comparing with Google, I find I have missed PVN too, to 14 persons is the correct count. Google has a '-' instead of a number for GN's second stint

      Delete
    7. Kishore, I must admit some of those initials don't ring a bell. One I can think of and don't see in your list is PVNR or did you use some other initials for that person?

      Delete
    8. Answer evident after my comment was posted :)

      Delete
    9. I too was about to post about ad-interim PM on two occasions, Gulzarilal Nanda, who died a few years ago unwept, unhonoured and unsung.

      He. like Lal Bahadur Shastri, one of those rarest breed of upright persons. Their wives lived in neglected condition until death, much in contract to many other celebrity spouses.

      Delete
    10. Pls read para 2 above as 'He, like LBS, was....'

      Delete
    11. "Their wives lived in neglected condition "

      Holds good now?

      Delete
    12. GN had two Acting PM stints of 13 days

      Delete
    13. Bhavan, rather silly of me to forget PVN. When my elder son was a kid, he used to do imitations of PVN with a pout.

      Delete
    14. I got 12. Missed out CS and CSh.

      Delete
    15. your 9.16 : Last line : much in 'contrast' to (instead of 'contract' to)

      Delete
    16. Ok here goes. Without googling, I promise

      1. Jawaharlal Nehru
      2. Lal Bahadur Shashtri
      3. I.K. Gujral (don't remember if he was there between 1 & 2 as well)
      4. Indira Gandhi
      5. VP Singh
      6. Chandrasekhar
      7. Ajit Singh?
      One more in this crazy period, Chautala, I think
      8 Indira Gandhi again
      9. Rajiv Gandhi
      10. PV Narasimha Rao
      11 AB Vajpayee
      12 Manmohan Singh

      Delete
    17. Ajit Singh, s father Charan Singh was PM for 6 months in late 70s after the Morarji Desai government fell and
      he had the dubious distinction of never facing parliament.

      Delete
  7. Col Sir, 8Dn clue is missing in the grid.

    ReplyDelete
  8. As first week of June closes in, it is "Back to School" with Gridman today

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rodney Dangerfield did a wonderful job. I remember his bath tub scene with "Bubbles"

      Delete
    2. Congrats, DDS on identifying the theme.

      Delete
  9. 13 Excel in al fresco? (5) OUTDO (~outdoor)

    What's the 'homophone' indicator here pl? Alfresco = In the open air (OED). Could it be 'air' for 'outdoor'(in the open)?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see it just as " 'outdo'er".
      Back to school? Yes, I think I should get back to solving school and learn afresh. Missed many.

      Delete
    2. It should be " 'outdo' or". Excel/ out do in outdoor.

      Delete
    3. Still hp needed right ? Or indirect telescopic?

      Delete
    4. I think it is normally written as single word- outdo- though sometimes we find the hyphenated version too.

      Delete
  10. Repeating for those who missed it yesterday

    Please see

    http://www.dramadose.com/mukhyamantri/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How many hats do you don?!

      Delete
    2. His head is the hat stand!

      Delete
    3. If I became the President I could say: "Mai .......
      ..
      ..
      hoon don, Sandhya"

      Delete
  11. Back after a very satisfying trip of the Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve. Posted a few selected pics on Facebook. Padmanabhan asked for the photos to be posted here. Will do if it's OK with Col.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome back, Raghu. Looking forward to those pics.

      Delete
    2. Don't know how to upload or send the link?

      Delete
    3. Put it in Picasa and share the link. Nice photos

      Delete
    4. See pics here on Google drive:

      https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B0qAq2PPgxWNQ25GYWNwSnN0ams&usp=sharing

      Delete
    5. Nice pics Raghu. Liked the 'Dancing Peacock'. Thanks for uploading the pics. BTW who is Aadith Ramesh?

      Delete
    6. Nice pics, Raghu. Pics of a lifetime. Lucky you!

      Delete
    7. MB,
      He is my nephew who was with me in the gypsy. I had forgotten to put the battery in my camera and pics of Sultan the cub are from his camera.

      Delete
    8. Thank you Raghu for sharing the pictures on "Listeners Choice'!. Excellent pictures. Tigers in the wild are a rarity and so close up! I am glad you had a nice outing- irrespective of the temp.

      Delete
    9. Welcome. It was very hot outside though inside the jungle it was a couple of degrees cooler. Driving over mud roads was bone rattling. Crossing dry river/ stream beds with small boulders also added to the agonising experience. However, it's all worth the while seeing this magnificent animal in in it's full glory.

      Delete
  12. Deepak: My response, though belated, to your comments on Sunday Special:
    I must confess, at the outset, that I'm not very good or keen in compiling, as I find it too onerous .However, since I decided to send you one, I was I agree, very impatient and hasty , due to the time elelent and hence I goofed up big time in many places. I'll try and improve.

    To answer the query of a few friends:

    Ajeesh: ENGUARD I meant to ensure safety of the surroundings. A weak indicator , I agree

    Abhay: Is adorable, this Spanish girl-the number in the bracket should have been 6 and not 5! No one seemed to have noticed? I meant a pretty Spanish baby.

    Mea Culpa !! Pardonne Moi !!

    ReplyDelete
  13. A piece of Indian Railwaiy info for all Senior Citizens here.
    Are you aware that there is a senior citizens quota? I never knew about it. I was booking my return tickets for 6th Jul from Chennai initially the page showed up as Waitlist but when I entered my name and age and ticked on the Senior Citizen tab and proceeded further to buy the WL ticket the next page showed up as 4 available in the Senior Citizen quota.
    So I am all set to attend the meet on 6th Jul.
    Those who are still sitting on the fence, and need to travel to get to the meet, better hurry up and decide.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This has been in existence since a long time. You can always check the availability on https://www.irctc.co.in/ and http://www.indianrail.gov.in/.

      I will be attending a wedding in Pondicherry on July 11 and be in Madras on 10 June. Unfortunately had done the bookings a couple of months back and so cannot alter the schedule for S & B meet.

      Delete
    2. Availability at IRCTC does not show a senior citizen quota per se. What is seen on the first screen is the status of seats in the general quota

      Delete
    3. Thank you Col.That explains it Col. Last time when I wanted to book, it showed waiting list. Since I was not sure of alt. trains I decided to go to the booking counter. Fortunately there is a Senior citizen counter where the queue is short or sometimes non existent. I could not understand how I was able to get a confirmed ticket for the same train. When you are successful, you don't worry much about the 'how' of it!

      While booking on line there is a clause about quota. I used to fill in 'general'. We should now fill in SC.

      Delete
    4. For a change, Col. is not springing a surprise this time ahd has made an announcement well in advance! I still vividly remember his surprise visit to wish CV on his 70th Birthday.

      Delete
  14. I parsed the wordplay for 13 a little differently: while al fresco does mean in the open air, it is most often used in the context of an event (mainly a meal) being held outdoors, so I assumed it was supposed to be OUT+DO (a party being held outside).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Abhay,
      That was my thinking while I tried to post a response but I held back..
      I do agree that it is not a good clue but there is some explanation!
      Apologies for inconvenience caused to any solver.

      Delete
  15. Thanks for the puzzle, Gridman (and for the blog, DG!). Today was a difficult one. About half the answers went in easily, then it was really slow. I loved the clueing for UMBRA: a masterful surface with a great device!

    Re. I LOOKED UP: to be used in the sense that is indicated in the clue (an admission of having consulted the dictionary), wouldn't it need to be I LOOKED *IT* UP? (Asking for clarity, not to find fault.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're absolutely right.
      As I was lying in bed and thinking about it, it occurred to me that if it had been I LOOKED IT UP, there might have been no complaints.
      I LOOKED UP would just mean I raised my head and saw in the upward direction.
      There has been some laxity.
      Other grid entries seem to be OK.

      Delete
    2. On 225, (and - VERY rarely - below the line on the Guardian puzzles), having the setter appear to share his/her views is uncommon (although very welcome!). On this blog, it seems to happen on a very regular basis. Thanks to all the setters for participating in the discussions without getting high-handed or defensive!

      Delete
    3. As I was lying in bed... I looked up... ;-)

      Delete
    4. As I was lying in bed...

      Always tell the truth ...

      Delete
  16. Please see the meanings against
    look up
    here:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/look+up
    So "I looked up" can well be I searched, I consulted the dictionary.
    Finally, I don't think there is any bloomer.
    Careful consideration is done while writing clues.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I looked up [the word]" = "I looked [it] up". I am not sure the former will work without the object, and a hanging object is not indicated in the clue. Not a bloomer, IMO, but it does seem to be non-standard usage.

      Delete
    2. Agreed! That can be the last word.

      Delete
  17. While reading out the oaths, some tend to mispronounce 'conscientiously'. Yesterday everyone managed it well.

    However, one from the South misread 'allegiance' as 'alliance'. Understandable!

    I appreciated the President getting up each time to read out the mai's or I's. And unfailingly say 'congratulations' to the incomers.

    And when one missed out saying his name, the President did not let it pass: Tell your name, he advised.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was struck by the disjointed, halting way in which almost all of them read out the oaths. (Sushma Swaraj's fluent reading was a notable exception.) I suspect the Hindi translation of the oaths is a part of the problem: especially in the oath of secrecy, all the conditionals make for very convoluted phrasing.

      Delete
    2. Yes, I also noticed and appreciated the President reminding him to mention his name. He did not take it merely as a routine to be gone through.

      Delete
    3. Our own MP from North Goa, Shripad Naik, had some problem and was asked to go back to the starting !

      Delete
  18. I agree. I too felt that the phraseology of the English version could have been better.

    Yes, some of them read well - understanding the words, nodding their heads, batting their eyelids. Most just plodded through the paras.

    ReplyDelete
  19. This is not Gridman's.(Read like 'This is not cricket')

    ReplyDelete
  20. Time to say good-bye to our good Ambassador
    Which took us all around, whatever be the weather
    From a mighty height
    It's going out of sight -
    Just cannot help feeling sadder and sadder,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RIP. I learnt on an Ambassador GDE609 !

      Delete
    2. Same here too. (Different No. of course)

      Delete
  21. On the swearing in ceremony, I found the diction of Sushma Swaraj, Smriti Irani and Maneka Gandhi very impeccable and confident.

    By the by, how dpo you give back door entry into the cabinet to losers in the election, though both Smriti and Arun Jetley are my favourites. Is it not amounting to favouritism, a form of venality? Surely, there are more deserving candidates within the BJP and in th NDA? Najma Hebtullah is a dark horse?

    Any way, we wish Modi Godspeed !

    ReplyDelete