Tuesday, 29 July 2014

No 11149, Tuesday 29 Jul 2014, Spinner


Eid Mubarak

Spinner has spun up a nice one today. Liked the PURI.

ACROSS
1   U.S. people who work with numbers botched up tests in haste (12) ANESTHETISTS
                                                    Cartoon by Rishi
10 It’s Fibonacci’s first number, perhaps even (2,3) IF NOT {I}{F} {NO}T Anno for T not clear (Addendum - {I{F} {NO}T} - See comments)
11 Reproducing with a new covering (9) CANOPYING {C{A}{N}OPYING}
12 Power-up to celebrate (6) PRAISE {P}{RAISE}
13 Farmer traps Himalayan-origin bird (8) PHEASANT {P{H}EASANT}
15 Man to talk to Crown, say (9) HEADDRESS {HE}{ADDRESS}
16 Mark first of September: Spinner returns! (4) SPOT {S}{POT<=}
20 Part of grid left unoccupied (4) IDLE [T]
21 Model lifestyle with happy heart, following ultimate fantasies (9) SCULPTURE {S}{CUL{haPpy}TURE}
24 Company that’s cleverer, with time, becomes richer (8) COSTLIER {CO}{S{T}LIER}
26 Squabble in Puri, for example (6) TIFFIN {TIFF}{IN} Tiffin I presume is peculiar to Tamilnadu only           
 
                                                 Cartoon by Rishi





28 Blunder by a Don corrected by one who does odd jobs (6,3) ERRAND BOY {ERR}{AND BOY*}
29 Dine with extremely ceremonial splendour (5) ECLAT {E{CeremoniaL}AT}
30 Line like “Liquid loan lassoes learned lords”? (12) ALLITERATION [Def by example] (Addendum  {AL{LITERATI}ON*} - See comments)

DOWN
2   Doctor Lenin, a pro unrivalled! (9) NONPAREIL*
3   Drop games to a team (3,5) SET ASIDE {SET} {A}{SIDE}
4   Break in without permission to see-saw (4) HACK HACKsaw (Addendum - [DD] - See comments)
5   Instrument designed with inlets? (3,7) TIN WHISTLE*
6   Soapiest liquid to disperse and remove fishy pigments (6) SEPIAS SoAPIESt*
7   God who resides in Kashi/Varanasi (5) SHIVA [T]
8   Stumbles after view’s cut on both sides (5) LIMPS gLIMPSe
9   A fool consumed shake (7) AGITATE {A}{GIT}{ATE}
14 Insect, flier or leather hunter? (7,3) CRICKET BAT {CRICKET} {BAT}
17 Minister’s office overthrown in soil of Tropical-America (9) PORTFOLIO [T<=]
                               Cartoon by Rishi
18 Hanukkah, Halloween and Holi have their origins in these (7) AITCHES [Def by example]
                                               Cartoon by Bhargav
19 Small weapon of 7 is loud (8) STRIDENT {S}{TRIDENT}
22 Gangster follows extremely confidential working of a genetic copy (6) CLONAL {ConfidentiaL}{ON}{AL}
23 Flies in angst, all over the place (5) GNATS*
25 Country’s ultimate tennis Open returns (5) SYRIA {tenniS}{RYIA<=} (Correction - {tenniS}{YRIA<=} - See comments)
27 He makes things colourful, adding yellow to red liquid (4) DYER {D{Y}ER*}

108 comments:

  1. 10 A.. I (f)(no) T..'s=has

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some nice clues up there.

      10A: "Has" is not a strong-enough containment indicator as I see it. It needs a proper qualifier, without which it could seem a little incomplete. The word could take several forms like - "has inside," "has outside," "had above" "has below" etc. So it'd be nicer if the instruction was more specific.

      Delete
    2. It is used in the same sense as in 'He has the keys' = 'The keys are with him'.

      Delete
    3. Has indicates possession so It's fine as a container.

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    4. If you take "has" to mean "eats", as in "He has dinner", it's actually a pretty strong containment indicator!

      Personally, I'm not very fond of 'with' as a containment indicator, though

      Delete
  2. 4 Break in without permission to see-saw (4) HACK HACKsaw

    Is this a DD?
    Break in without permission to see = SAW = HACK?

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  3. 8 D: Addictification. Me too once got addichchu-fied (hit) while gazing and chasing a chick...(in the garden!!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adolescents adore any and all amorous accidents!

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    2. It appears that some men in these parts are 15 years plus decades of experience.

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    3. A 30a by CGB at 851. And I can confirm his 842 too. He was still limping from the encounter when I last saw him

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  4. The tiffin image looks very appetising, being breakfast time. Tiifin is used in TS & AP too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Telangana Samsthanam (?)

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    2. CGB @ 11:

      Yes, you could call it Telangana Samsthanam of KCR !! :)

      Delete
  5. In 30a, not only the part in quotes is an example of alliteration, the entire clue too is an example. So can it be called an &lit as well?

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  6. 'Tiffin' is a slang expression from 18th century England, still lingering in parts of India. May not be current in modern-day Britain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's used predominantly in the South esp. TN, TS and AP. Don't know about Kerala & Karnataka.

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    2. Only in inland Karnataka perhaps.

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    3. Surprised to note that it is included in Chambers.

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  7. Nice offering from Spinner. Thoroughly enjoyed eating Puri(s) for breakfast without any squabble! Thank you Spinner :-)))

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  8. What CV omitted to mention in his cartoon- "...and bring me a plate of pooris as well!"

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  9. My! When did Me! visit colleges in Chennai? Or just a name change from other parts of the country?

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  10. Thank you for the nice offering Spinner. Took you to be a real spinner ( of the ball) and missed out on the upside down mammal.

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  11. Seems *with* is Spinner's favourite container indicator

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  12. Seen, yesterday, how our fielders were sent on a leather hunt by English Batsmen?!

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  13. Spinner's 18d device seems to have been used by TH today in its headline about Spinner's favourite game:

    Bell, Ball**** and Butt*** pile it on ...

    Surprisingly these people not only have B in the first place, their third and fourth are the same ...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Balance with an extra L and Butler with an extra T...

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    2. Ballance was the ballast & Buttler feasted on the Indian bowling- probably Spinner was badly needed there!

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    3. Cooked and served well by Butler Mani

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    4. And in the Metro Plus section we have info about the book
      TALES FROM TRUMPTER TO TENDULKAR (which is an ode to the game)

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  14. 7D - SHIVA well-hidden.
    17D - PORTFOLIO - excellent reversal.

    The letter H is pronounced AITCH, but in many parts of India, it is pronounced HETCH. Any idea?

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  15. Wondered why Kishore didn't have a comment on 10 a (probably being his favourite subject?).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fib on a cubic centimetre? I followed that!

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  16. Yes, I was also looking for it. Elementary? (Dear Watson?)

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  17. MB,
    Did you notice the "all over the place" in 23 D?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I did. How can I forget my first stint in a Fighter Squadron of GNATS ?! The midget Sabre killers!!

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    2. MB, did you know one of our setters was a Gnat pilot who saw service during '65 in 23rd Squadron along with famous pilots like Johney Greene, Trevor Keelor, VS Pathania, Anil Tipnis and S Krishnaswany (the last two having ended up as chiefs)?

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    3. Did not come across them because I was posted to No.9 Squadron stationed at Hindon (Ghaziabad) during 1973. Thanks for the info. :)

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    4. I was a frequent visitor to Hindon in the early '70s. Remember Katori mill from where one had to take a cycle rickshaw to AFS Hindon? I learnt swimming in that 8 shaped pool there. The person I am referring to was also in Hindon those days ...

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    5. I think I saw Prem Pujari at the theatre there

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    6. Maybe he was in No.23 Squadron. In fact both 9 and 23 Squadrons were operating from A.F.Stn Hindon during 1973. Prior to moving here they were stationed at Halwara and Srinagar respectively. I remember Katori Mill and also Mohan Meakins Brewery !

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    7. Yeah, he was in Halwara too. Yes, I remember Kapil's place on the oppsite side of the road. I stopped drinking apple juice after visiting it.

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    8. Fond memories of IAF and Hindon ! :)

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    9. Kishore at 12.51-
      I will take care not to visit that place since I still relish my apple juice!

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    10. Col Mohan and Brig Mohan probably never touched it too ...

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    11. I wonder what Gp Cpt Mohan would have to say ;-)

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  18. There is a little more to 30A than meets the eye.

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  19. Replies
    1. Completely missed this part of the parsing - the clue works very well as an example of the solution as it is, so didn't feel the need to explore further. Good spotting!

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    2. With 'liquid' as anind?

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    3. SS
      Didn't notice that additional beauty until it was pointed out.
      That's great!
      The other day a setter himself had to point out the 'anthakshari' trick in his grid. And now you have had to point out the extra bit in a clue.
      We are all experienced, keen solvers but occasionally a too-cleverly-hidden device is overlooked.
      Is that a success for the setter? Or a wasted effort?

      Delete
    4. Thank you. Personally, I consider it a success. The presence of such online forums ensures it doesn't become a wastes effort, so I'm also thankful for that.

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    5. Superb, Spinner! I too understood 30a only after it was explained by Ajeesh.

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  20. I really enjoyed solving this CW. Beautiful. And what is that on 30A?

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  21. Enjoyed the crossword - thank you, Spinner! Was held up a bit in the NW quadrant, but it was fairly smooth sailing otherwise. Got 10a thanks to the crossers, but couldn't parse it at all - thanks for the explanation, Ajeesh.

    Right at the start, spent some time trying to think of an American word for statisticians, before the penny dropped - nice misdirection!

    Thanks to DG and the cartoonists!

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  22. I did a simple quiz for my FB group Air-conditioning & Refrigeration Chennai. People in this line may not be interested in cryptic clues. So made it simple except for one which will be a sitter for them. Perhaps Sowmya might like to lift a few, convert them into cryptic clues for her crossword!!

    (1) ??? , bye-bye, cheerio. ??? group manufactures this brand of air-conditioners.
    (2) The sun is also this, a ----. And if it were to be the colour of the sky, you will end up buying this brand of air-conditioner.
    (3) A courier may also be called a ???. A brand of air-conditioner!!
    (4) This brand a hit? A Chinese brand? No way!!
    (5) If cricketer Clive were to buy an air-conditioner, this brand might be his first choice!!
    (6) For your pencil to write nicely, the tip ought to be like this brand of air-conditioner.
    (7) People from the Federal Bureau of Investigation initially somehow were looking for this brand.
    (8) Customer humming the hindi song “Ae ji, o ji, lo ji, suno ji” entered the shop and bought this brand.
    (9) He rapidly moved among members of his family pooled money and bought this brand.
    (10) He bought this brand with pride. Now his neighbours envy!
    (11) A1 kind? Yes he somehow was and bought this brand.
    (12) A lover of rhymes. He went for this iconic brand in the end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1 Tata 2 Blue star 5 Lloyd 6 Sharp 10 Onida

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    2. 1 Small correction: Voltas from the house of TATA.

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    3. Daikin is not the answer for this clue. But factually correct. As I said, my clue may not be very clear. I meant it to be a hidden clue! Daikin is in the clue set elsewhere!!

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    4. 4. Hitachi :) After seeing your hint!

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    5. Did not know about FBI. Knew it only as 'Bureau'.

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    6. Initially somehow // It is IFB air-conditioner. They are famous for front loading washing machines. Now into air-conditioners also.

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    7. CGB..looks like, there is a lot of interesting stuff in my "turf".,Are the unsolved ones 3. CARRIER, 8 LG and 12. SAMSUNG. A few brands here certainly look interesting as options for clues:) Look out in my future crosswords:)

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    8. 8 Though LG too could be the right answer, I was looking for OG which appears in the song. Interestingly, there is no OG air-conditioner! It is GENERAL with an emblem G within a circle before the brand name. Lots of people of lower middle class coming on TR (Transfer of Residence) from Middle East used to bring these air-conditioners for resale here and it is they who gave the name OG. It has stuck. All and sundry now call it as OG AC. 12. PANASONIC (it rhymes with ICONIC).

      Delete
  23. Col,

    4d: HACK is DD (post @8.36) and confirmed by Spinner.

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  24. 25 Down: Typo in anno to be corrected. {YRIA<-}

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  25. Not at home. Will correct after I get back

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  26. OK. Just pointed out since you are a perfectionist....

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  27. A very enjoyable crossword. Spinner always takes you for a toss initially, have you stumped a few times but ultimately a good flight.

    ReplyDelete
  28. TIFFIN pronounced as TIFFAN by friends in the South. What constitutes a TIFFIN? Is it a Brunch? or Elevenses? or four 'o' clock Tea? Certqinly not High Tea ! In Bombay it is the Home cooked Lunch and brought in by those non-MBA dabbawallas, anxiously awaited at 1pm and promptly and unfailingly delivered before 1230 pm, with an apology love-note from the wifey for that small Tiff -IN the morning. At times, it is the mix-up in the carriers, but very rarely that added to the flavour away from one's own home that adds to the multi-cultured cuisine !.

    In the north, it is that ubiquitous thermos-lined container with its rotis, sabzis and daal carried to the office and stuck into one's hands of the husband in a hurry by the wifey at the last moment, with his hankie and wallet?
    A culture typically Indian- a legacy of the Raj?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A beautiful Hindi movie called Lunch Box was made featuring the dabba and the dabbawallah

      Delete
  29. Spinner seems to prefer 'Liquids' to 'Solids'! Check clues 30A, 6D and 27D. :)

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  30. The puzzle did flow well for me, though 'liquid' is overused for anagram indication (is 3 a record?) As VJ said, 'has' and 'with' are weak containment indicators, in general, because they could also be charade indicators. In 28A, 'by' links wordplay and definition. Not sure if this is a valid connector. Though not in this clue, 'by' could change the part of speech of the definition - 'by luck' could mean 'fortunately' instead of 'fortune', for example.

    In 6D, the transitive verbs 'disperse' and 'remove' must precede the fodder 'to' to convey the cryptic instruction grammatically.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shyam after a long time?

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    2. Agree with Shyam. 6d instruction to remove TO does not logically follow. Was also confused with 'soapy pigments'. Couldn't it have been just pigments?

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    3. Soapy pigments? It's 'fishy pigments' = SEPIAS = 'A dark brown ink or pigment originally prepared from the secretion of the cuttlefish'

      Delete
  31. Some really good clues. Liked ANESTHETISTS, IDLE and AITCHES in particular.

    I'm with Shyam (long time no see?) on the overuse of 'liquid' and the deletion indicators in 6d.

    But I'm happy with 'by' as a connector. 'By' has connotations of 'by way of' or 'through' which seems reasonable as a link between wordplay and definition. Similarly I can accept 'has' meaning 'possesses' as a valid containment indicator. Reluctantly I also accept 'with' meaning 'having or containing' too.

    30a, the very good wordplay notwithstanding, I can't make much sense of what the surface story is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe "soapy solution" would have been better. But liquid is also apt.

      Delete
    2. Just the fancy of alliteration and he has managed a anagram. No surface story and obviously cannot be.It is just a different type of a clue.

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    3. The surface story I was trying to tell was of some educated people being captured by the attractions of a loan in liquid (cash) form. Obviously it has it's limitations, but I thought it was worth a shot.

      Delete
  32. Smooth one from Spinner. Really enjoyed solving it.

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  33. Richard@09:42,
    The problem of mispronouncing 'aitch' is not endemic to India (or certain parts of it). Here's a humorous take on the issue: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3y0CD2CoCs (the video could be unsuitable if there are little children around).

    ReplyDelete
  34. I did not realise this overuse of 'liquid'. Probably 'dyer' and 'pigments' instantly made me relate with liquids, and I didn't think about the repetition. 6D, I realised it was a compromise. Will avoid in future. Thanks to Shyam and Bhavan for the insightful comments. Have always looked forward to Bhavan's critique.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I employ 'by' as a connector in the 'given by' or 'by way of' sense. It looks acceptable to me.

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  36. Can we hit a century with spinner ?

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  37. Repeated use of abbreviations or single letters, anag signals and other indications , even words in the clues; over-use of a particular clue type such as anagram/hidden - these things can be detected only if we do an analysis of the clues after we are done with a crossword.
    Some of the setters may not have time for that.
    Not all of us have a test solver - but a test solver may bother more about solvability rather than these nitty-gritty things. So ultimately it is the setter's responsibility.
    When we write clues we concentrate on word play, cryptic grammar, etc. So we wouldn't be bothered about repetition in the final work.
    That requires a separate look.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Wrt my above post, also read:

    http://www.crosswordunclued.com/2010/11/so-slips-might-not-show.html

    ReplyDelete
  39. Ajeesh @ 4:49,
    Here's the 100th run

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  40. MB, were you at Amballa by any chance. Dhatighara?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for late reply. These are the places where I was deployed in IAF during my tenure of 20 years. : Starting from 1968 - Hakimpet, Bagdogra, Hindon, Pune, Bhuj, Jodhpur. Initial training at Bangalaore (Jalahalli West) in 1967. On temporary duty, during aircraft excercise/fire range practice etc, had been to places like Bikaner, Jaisalmer, Srinagar etc.

      Delete
  41. Great job, Sunnet. In Anesthetists, which the British spell with an a, was it deliberate to elide the a as the indicator was American ?

    Somehow I felt that TIFFIN didn't fit in with PURI !! Too puffed out? What constitutes a TIFFIN?

    Does LIMP also mean STUMBLE?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, Sunnet, I meant Spinner ! So sssorry !

      Delete