Saturday, 23 April 2016

No 11683, Saturday 23 Apr 2016, Buzzer

Across

6 North Indian city had underground ... (5,3) DEHRA DUN {HAD UNDER}*
9 ... to take advantage of before those (4,2) PREY ON {PRE}{Y ON}
10 Boundary fence lacking height (4) EDGE {hEDGE}
11 Old nurse skilful and capable of being stretched (10) EXTENDABLE {EX}{TEND}{ABLE}
12 Iron chains round perimeter (6) FRINGE {F{RING}E}
14 Flawless 0.1 mm rings suitable for all (7) OPTIMUM {O}{PT}{I}{M{U}M}
15 Significant or groundbreaking ... (5-10) EARTH SHATTERING {EARTH}{SHATTERING}
18 ...painter's picture? Like like (7) PICASSO {PIC}{AS}{SO}
20 Shall unplug blocking around drain (6) NULLAH (T<=)
22 Struggle // meeting // contract // undertaking (10) ENGAGEMENT (MD)
23,23 Dn. Policeman circling hospital repeatedly in a hurry (4-4) CHOP-CHOP {C{H}OP}*2
24 Travel discomfort, let down in a fancy car (3,3) JET LAG {LET*} in {JAG}
25 Think about // surrender (4,4) TURN OVER (DD)

Down

1 Lake that is below zero in the middle (4) ERIE {zERo}{IE}
2 Suffering of one out on sidelines (8) IDLENESS {SiDELINES}* &lit
3 Grasp in etude defining a music composer (6) SPINET (T)

4 Married lad, clipped butterfly (3,7) RED ADMIRAL {MARRIED LAD}*

5 Peer around bowled over by the French island (8) NOBLEMAN {{NO}{B}}<={LE}{MAN} Edited- See Comments
7 Duck is often seen behind weir (5) EIDER {bEhInD wEiR}
8 Motorman often going off the rails? Never (3,3,1,6) NOT FOR A MOMENT {MOTORMAN OFTEN}*
13 Obvious changes around end of year celebration (10) NOTICEABLE {NOTICEABLE}* around {yeaR}= CELEBRATION
16 Small program, overstated (8) APPENDED {APP}{ENDED}
17 A medicinal solution can heal over time (8) TINCTURE {TIN}{C{T}URE}
19 Dexterity mostly needed to ride a sled (6) SLEIGH {SLEIGHt}
21 Very much like one element of ade? (5) ADORE ? (Addendum - A, D or E - See comments)

Reference list

Height=H, Old=Ex, Iron=Fe, Suitable for all=U, Picture=Pic, Policeman=Cop, Hospital=H
That is=IE, One=I, Over=On, Bowled=B, The French=Le, Island=Man, Can=Tin, Time=T

Color/Font Scheme

Definition,Solution,Component letters,Anagram Indicator,C/C indicator,Reversal Indicator,Hidden word IndicatorLetter Pick indicator,Deletion Indicator,Homophone Indicator,Movement Indicator,Positional Indicator,Substitution IndicatorLink/Connector

36 comments:

  1. In the prev blog I have posted a lengthy Comment reg a topic I raised yesterday.
    Please let me know if it makes sense and whether I have managed to make my point clear.
    If it is wrong/silly, say so and I am ready to apologise.
    You need not agree with my point. The question is whether the Comment makes a point at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand your point now. You are distinguishing between the reversal of letters in the clue as against reversal in the grid fill. You are saying that the two should be treated separately and the reversal indicator suitable to each should be used. If it is in the gridfill right to left/ top to bottom will be applicable, whereas if it is in the clue only just reversal or right to left.

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  2. 5Dn around bowled over {NO}{B}}<= Ramesh has taken 'over' as Reversal Indicator, then it would be ON/B <=; which will give BNO
    I took it as
    bowled over = B/ON around as Reversal Indicator
    B/ON <= gives NOB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't that what he has indicated

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    2. Rajan is right. I have changed the anno

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    3. Thanks, Ramesh Correction to be made in the Reference List also.

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  3. 21 Very much like one element of ade? (5) ADORE?

    A, D or E

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  4. Great solution for a great clue!
    I join the applause.

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  5. Superb puzzle! Was stuck in the SW corner for a long time before Picasso appeared...Obviously Optimum was the COD...almost all clues were superb...thought dehradun was a single word...
    Lovely blog too

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  6. Even I did not notice it and since Buzzer has relocated to Australia long ago, it is understandable.

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  7. I remembered it as two words. Lonely Planet lists it as such. My father and my uncle must have been posted there when they were in RIAF and IAF. It is best known for the institutions the British left behind.

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    Replies
    1. To the best of my knowledge it is one word.

      Following is from Wikipaedia

      Dehradun is made up of two words: 'Dehra' is derived from the word "dera", deriving from griha and meaning home. "Doon" is a term for the valley that lies between the Himalayas and the "Shivaliks". When Ram Rai Ji, son of Guru Har Rai Ji, came to this region with his followers, he established a camp here for them. Around this time, the modern city of Dehradun started to develop. This is when the word dehra was linked to doon, and thus the city was named Dehradun.In Skanda Purana, Dun is mentioned as a part of the region called Kedar Khand, the abode of Shiva. In ancient India during the Mahabharata epic era, Dronacharya the great teacher of Kauravas and Pandavas, lived here hence the name, "Dronanagari" (द्रोणनगरी, lit. city of Drona).[5][6] Some historians believe that the word dehra can be regarded as a term for camping.[7]

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    2. In Hindi, "Deraa Daalna" means "to set up camp"

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  8. Received message in whats app today...couldnt resist posting here..
    Did You Know These Everyday Things Had Names?

    Glabella - The space between your eyebrows is called a glabella.

    Petrichor - The way it smells after the rain is called petrichor.

    Aglet - The plastic or metallic coating at the end of your shoelaces is called an aglet.

    Barm - The foam on beer is called a barm.

    Wamble - The rumbling of stomach is actually called a wamble.

    Vagitus - The cry of a new born baby is called a vagitus.

    Tines - The prongs on a fork are called tines.

    Phosphenes - The sheen or light that you see when you close your eyes and press your hands on them are called phosphenes.

    Box Tent - The tiny plastic table placed in the middle of a pizza box is called a box tent.

    Overmorrow - The day after tomorrow is called overmorrow.

    Minimus - Your tiny toe or finger is called minimus.

    Agraffe - The wired cage that holds the cork in a bottle of champagne is called an agraffe.

    Vocables - The 'na na na' and 'la la la', which don't really have any meaning in the lyrics of any song, are called vocables.

    Interrobang - When you combine an exclamation mark with a question mark (like this ?!), it is referred to as an interrobang.

    Columella Nasi - The space between your nostrils is called columella nasi.

    Armscye - The armhole in clothes, where the sleeves are sewn, is called armscye.

    Dysania - The condition of finding it difficult to get out of the bed in the morning is called dysania.

    Griffonage - Unreadable hand-writing is called griffonage (Are you reading this dear doctors?)

    Tittle - The dot over an “i” or a “j” is called tittle.

    Crapulence - That utterly sick feeling you get after eating or drinking too much is called crapulence.

    Brannock Device - The metallic device used to measure your feet at the shoe store is called Brannock device.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very interesting and useful words. Thanks 👍

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    2. I am sure I have encountered Interrobang somewhere

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  9. Take notice of these words. Many setters will take a leaf from the list.

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    Replies
    1. I remember to have seen 'Tine' in a CW, but I am not sure it is THC.

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    2. I have seen aglet a few times

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  10. Nice. Didn't get engagement even with crossings :(

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    Replies
    1. It's all because of odd-even. Today's 23rd

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  11. Glabella and Columella are familiar to us medicos.

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  12. Columella nasi reminded me of the time I shoved some nasi (nasi goreng, to be precise) into the space below it

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  13. There is this famous line in a song in an old Tamil film - pattinaththilae dehra pottu kotti muzhakkuvom - we will set up camp in the city and sing vociferously...

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