Tuesday, 22 June 2010

No 9875, Tuesday 22 Jun 10, Gridman

ACROSS
1   - Informal talk with girl model imbibing tea (8) - {CHI{T}{CHA}T}
5   - Burning a fine material (6) -{A}{F}{LAME}
9   - Attack small relative for a kind of leather (8) - {GO AT}{S}{KIN}
10 - Boy told to dance (6) - MORRIS [DD]
12 - Go out once with appeal (4) - {EX}{IT}
13 - Bird to move to river with one fish (10) - {BUDGE}{R}{I}{GAR}
15 - Gigolo, dropping a ring, running to a gallery (6) - {LOGGIo*}{A}
17 - Consumed with school, say (5) - EATEN(~eton)
20 - Foreign national is king in film (5) - {C{R}OAT}
21 - Lean content of some agreements (6) - MEAGRE [T]
24 - Fine piano had us jumping (10) - DIAPHANOUS*
27 - Lot of money for oriental material (4) - {LAC}{E}
29 - As used to address a judge (6) - MILORD [CD]
30 - Radical at finish in California sees faithful signs (8) - {C{RED}{END}A}
31 - On the job, with no hand in text accompanier (2,4) - ArT WORK
32 - Disturbed old people taking kind of palm tea, we hear (8) - {AG{ITA}{T}ED}
DOWN
1   - Reportedly ring a young swimmer (6) - CYGNET(~signet)
2   - Sort of type inclined to be emphatic (6) - ITALIC [E]
3   - About to deposit money (4) -{CA}{SH}(Correction - {C}{ASH} )
4   - Farewell announcement that is uninspiring, to begin with (5) - {AD}{IE}{U}
6   - Knock down father going round small room (5) -{F{LOO}R}
7   - To commandeer, roar furiously at the wicket (8) - {ARRO*}{GATE}
8   - Hold sacred Poles herein roaming around (8) - {E{NS}HRINE*}
11 - Lizard using not singular but a double disguise (6) - {IGU{A}Ns*}{A}
14 - Spoils implement by throwing it up (4) - LOOT<-
16 - Playing recklessly? (6) - GAMING [CD]
17 - Long to start late and receive money as payment (4) - yEARN
18 - Bill, ace, intended to go up in the world of scholars (8) - {AC}{A}{DEMIA<-}
19 - Alarm now about an ancient body of rules (5,3) -   {ROMAN LAW*}
22 - Bird found by girl in hollow gallipot (6) - {G{ANNE}T}
23 - Bomb found by darling on a road (6) - {PET}{A}{RD}
25 - One who engages employees in a Cheshire restaurant (5) - HIRER [T]
26 - Strip of equipment with bender: ring comes off (5) - {U}{NRIG*} Shouldn't this have been 'Strip off'
28 - Make a change that will turn the tide (4) - EDIT*

54 comments:

  1. Hi,

    Missed on Petard and Morris. However, over all much more satisfactory than last few days. Thums Up had a campaign "Happy Days are here again" probably based on "Happy Days Are Here Again" the campaign song for FDR’s Presidential campaign which became the unofficial theme of the Democratic Party is probably the theme for the day. Its first few lines

    So long sad times
    Go long bad times
    We are rid of you at last

    Howdy gay times
    Cloudy gray times
    You are now a thing of the past

    Happy days are here again
    The skies above are clear again
    So let's sing a song of cheer again
    Happy days are here again
    probably echoes the feelings of many solvers here.

    For the full song and lyrics:
    HAPPY DAYS

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  2. Good morning

    Nice puzzle. Learnt a few new words like BUDGERIGAR, LOGGIO, DIAPHANOUS by Googling.

    MILORD (in abridged form) was really smart. For some time, I relied on HONOUR and got stuck. But with crossings cracked it.

    CYGNET eluded me. Kicking myself for not getting MORRIS.

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  3. Isn't it awesome when there's no doubt in your mind for 100% of the clues? - No pause to wonder! Wonderment ...

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  4. And no using of shift key with number keys: @#&%$#

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  5. Loved fabrics Lame, and Lace.

    For CHITCHAT, I assumed T was for model (Thunderbird, etc.).

    EATEN, CROAT, ITALIC, FLOOR and PETARD were my favourites today

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  6. 26d Yes, an extra f would have been in order. Seems like strip off is the cause of yesterday's topless illusion.

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  7. 26D - Yes, an UNRIG is an equipment that strips OFF, or strips a vessel OF something. In the clue, OFF would have been better, of course.

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  8. 26D - Strip of equipment with bender: ring comes off (5) - {U}{NRIG*} Shouldn't this have been 'Strip off'

    This is not an argument nor to dispute anyone. Just making a point.

    The difference between between 'strip' and 'strip off' can be elucidated with these examples.

    1. The sportman was stripped of his title after having tested positive for drug abuse.

    2. In a reported case of honour killing, a poor villager was lynched by the crowd after his clothes were stripped off.

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  9. After so much of NJ's (lack of) language skills, the missing F in 26D didn't matter since the rest of the clue is so strong.

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  10. Regarding comic headlines yesterday, I cant resist quoting a sports commentator: 'The secret of ______ 's success is that before every match his wife kisses his golf balls'.

    To keep things decent, I have just added one extra word, which was not a part of the comment.

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  11. 'Strip of' is not a typo.
    'Strip' or 'strip off' or 'strip [something] of [something]' can mean 'unrig'.
    But in the surface reading 'strip of equipment' means a strip or piece of equipment.
    'Strip' (without of or off added) is the def for word reqd.

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  12. Deepak, I think 26D is all right.

    I think "Strip of equipment" is not the same as "strip-off equipment."

    An equipment is stripped off here. It's not an equipment used to strip off.

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  13. What a relief to be able to talk about the solutions that the ineptitude of the clue-making.

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  14. Agreed Strip would lead to UNRIG, in that case what is 'of equipment' doing in the clue. It doesn't add anything there?

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  15. But then 'of equipment' plays no role! So the clue may be criticised for being less than satisfactory.
    Must have passed through all stages of checking.

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  16. @VJ,

    You yourself have justified use of off in your answer with 'an equipment is stripped off here'!!

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  17. Strange to hear Richard finds BUDGERIGAR(the Colonel has put up the cute blue birdie I keep as pet!) a new word! Naive he is! To stand outside the masquerade we are all happily playing together!!!!!!

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  18. Come to think of it, the phrase 'strip [something] of equipment' can be regarded as the def for word reqd. This must have been the setter's intention.

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  19. VJ
    Your post gave me an idea in reading the setter's mind!

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  20. An equipment is not being stripped off. A rig is being stripped of equipment. So the construction is correct

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  21. Deepak, maybe I've not made my point clear.

    I think you should read it as "equipment is removed" or somthing like that.

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  22. pp @ 09:09

    'Ignorance, Madam, pure ignorance'! (Courtesy: Dr Samuel Johnson). I never consider myself as a know-all and am happy to learn new things every day.

    My comment was prepared before the Colonel posted today's edition.

    Btw, there is an alarming kind of gender imbalance in the blog posters. Nice to see pp and Gita showing up quite early. Please, ladies, participate more avidly.

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  23. Please visit
    http://dictionary.infoplease.com/unrig
    and look up the definitions.

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  24. 'gender imbalance'!!! ha! ha! ha! Not keen are we to fight for even 33%! Not many ladies lucky like me with lots of idle hours at hand!!!

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  25. CV,

    I am surprised you are referring to an online dictionary, something which you normally shun!!

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  26. 14D spoilS and Loot - is it okay?

    Richard Sir, don't be too humble.

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  27. PPMadam wrote,

    Not many ladies lucky like me with lots of idle hours at hand!!!

    May I add, having established long ago on Madam's blog, "and not many ladies charming like me who have their husband completely wrapped around their finger!!!" :-) I could add that. Couldn't I PPmadam?

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  28. Subs 09:55 - thanks, my sentiment was genuine.

    Re 14D - I feel LOOT can be equated to its context in the expression 'sharing the spoils' which means 'sharing the loot'.

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  29. Spoils is v. in surface reading.
    As def for word reqd, it is n. plural.
    And spoils, n. pl., is 'booty' or 'loot' as in the 'spoils of war'.

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  30. Deepak
    I was lazy to leave the computer chair and reach for my trusted Chambers.
    I am glad to say the dict has 'to strip of equipment' as the def.
    Gridman, we should think, does his dictionary work for every clue of his.
    I do refer to online dictionaries but rather carefully.
    It depends upon what it is and how it is compiled.
    I will avoid some where anyone can enter any word and give any meaning! The Urban Dictionary is the one where you can get the meanings of any vulgar words in our vernaculars.

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  31. The tube light in my brain has finally started glowing, I get it now.

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  32. Anyway it did generate a lot of comments.

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  33. Some of the words and definitions on urban dictionary are really funny. I totally love it.

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  34. 29A reminds me of court scenes in Hindi movies, just the other day I saw a movie with Premnath spewing out MILORD in his very own style.

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  35. If the learned judge is a woman, how do they address her?

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  36. Deepak
    Change tubelight to CFL.

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  37. CFL's do not have the flicker effect of the Tubelight !!!

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  38. CV@11:52,

    Good question. Must have a look at some old Hindi movies where they had a lady Judge and see how she was addressed, offhand cannot remember any such movie.
    Any suggestions from the others?

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  39. Why not Milady as that comes from My Lady just as Milord comes from My Lord

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  40. When it's Milady I tend to think of the woman in the boudoir than the verdict deliverer!

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  41. 'the woman in the boudoir', 'the verdict deliverer'! How expressive and exact are your descriptions! C-Vasi, you have a fine knack of choosing, using words/phrases!

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  42. Milady reminds of the 3Ms, Athos, Porthos and Aramis

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  43. The word reminds of those weirdly shaped candies. I even remember the ad (90s stuff).... "melody kao, kudh jaan jao."

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  44. Sunday, June 20 was the LONGEST DAY OF THE YEAR 2010

    How come none of remembered, especially when there were 64 posts on this blog?

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  45. Read: How come none of us remembered...

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  46. TRIVIA TIME: Signs of the Times

    VISITORS
    Husbands only. One per patient.
    (in a hospital in UK)

    In case of fire, please do your utmost to alarm the hall porter.
    (in a hotel in Austria)

    Customers giving orders will be promptly executed.
    (at a tailoring shop in Mumbai)

    Haircutting while you wait.
    (at a barber shop in Dublin)

    The typist's reproduction equipment is not to be interfered with without the prior permission of the Manager.
    (Notice taped on a photocopying machine)

    No Games
    Keep beach clear for litters
    (Notice on Silvermine Bay, Hongkong - this might have been replaced by now)

    If you have any desires during nights, please take advantage of the chambermaid.
    (in a hotel in Switzerland)

    ps: To open jar, pierce with a pin to release vacuum - then push off.
    (instruction on a jar of fruit jam)

    I am leaving the space for others.

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  47. LOL. Really loved this one.

    If you have any desires during nights, please take advantage of the chambermaid.
    (in a hotel in Switzerland)

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  48. Nice post.

    I say,
    The emphasis of a barber school's education is to teach the essentials of providing hair and skin services for men. They often learn to perform razor styling, hair cutting and coloring, blow drying, foam shaves, steam facials, and facial massages.
    Using a good hair salon is key to great hair care. But how do you select the right hair salon from the many choices available?
    You can do to guarantee that you always receive the best hair cuts, latest professional techniques and stellar service is to choose the right hair salon. Granted, that is easier said than done. With hair salons on practically every street corner, narrowing down your options to find the right salon can be confusing.
    Specialty Hair Cuts Baltimore

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