Sunday, 10 July 2011

No 2642, Sunday 10 Jul 11

ACROSS
1   - Dominate on show (8) - OVERBEAR [CD]
5   - Pen note about one in block (6) - STYMIE {STY}{M{I}E}
9   - This animal could make worker run away (8) - ANTELOPE {ANT}{ELOPE}
10 - Reportedly vulgar passage (6) - (~coarse)COURSE
11 - Prepared to risk everything, so no other joint will do (4,2,7) - NECK OR NOTHING
14 - Not included in special edition (5) - EXTRA [DD]
15 - Touching, calling for forgiveness (9) - REMISSION Anno pending [DD]See comments
17 - Spoil old lady and boy with English jam (9) - MARMALADE {MAR}{MA}{LAD}{E}
19 - Slip in left part of church (5) - LAPSE {L}{APSE}
21 - Make an unwarranted fuss, and duly rub mercer the wrong way (3,4,6) - CRY BLUE MURDER*
24 - Slowly locking a shed (4-2) - LEAN TO {LE{A}N-TO}
25 - Appear suddenly, blooming after holiday (5,3) - BREAK OUT {BREAK} {OUT}
26 - I eat after one - duck? (6) - IODINE {I}{O}{DINE}
27 - Bird studied, we hear, at dawn (8) - REDSTART  (~read){RED}{START}

DOWN
1   - An examination in morality (4) - ORAL [T]
2   - Formerly caught basking in shade, like the dodo? (7) - EXTINCT {EX}{TIN{C}T}
3   - Hood in Virginia following a cab, all agitated (9) - BALACLAVA {BALACLA*}{VA}
4   - Suitable nick (11) - APPROPRIATE [DD]
6   - Fish off Turkey, seawards (5) - TROUT {TR}{OUT}
7   - Swallow one gin and vermouth (7) - MARTINI {MARTIN}{I} My COD literally.
8   - In Greece, men's deceptive appearances (10) - EMERGENCES*
12 - Assumed name of rogue mender, criminal (3,2,6) - NOM DE GUERRE*
13 - Evil crime involved importing Latin pasta (10) - VERMICELLI VERMICE(L)LI*
16 - Speaks about a son and daughter making a musical (5,4) - SALAD DAYS {S{A}{LAD} {D}AYS}
18 - Fox pelt said to be on a road? (7) - REYNARD (~rain){REYN}{A}{RD}
20 - Trellis made from a bulky piece of wood agent erected (7) - PERGOLA {PER}{GOL}{A}<-
22 - Divulge information got from head of language college (3,2) - LET ON {L}{ET ON}
23 - A flighty creature up to some criminal activity (2,2) - AT IT {A}{T IT}



29 comments:

  1. Swallow one gin and vermouth (7) - {MARTIN}{I} My COD literally.

    :P

    ReplyDelete
  2. 15 - Touching, calling for forgiveness (9) - REMISSION Anno pending

    DD: 1. Soliciting money

    2. Absolution

    ReplyDelete
  3. Reg. this definition about Soliciting Money, I recall there was a Manna clue several moon ago, something like, "Literary touch? (7,6) for Begging Letter as the solution..

    ReplyDelete
  4. Touching: RE
    Calling: MISSION
    forgiveness: REMISSION

    ReplyDelete
  5. I go with Sudalamani. Though 'touch' in the sense of soliciting money is well known to PGW readers, it does not seem to tie up with remission, which matches with absolution/forgiveness.

    ReplyDelete
  6. 15 - Touching, calling for forgiveness (9) - REMISSION Anno pending

    I also go with Sudalamani's Anno.
    Touching = Re is there in that long list.

    ReplyDelete
  7. 3d reminded me of The Charge of the Light Brigade

    ReplyDelete
  8. Sudalamani's parsing of REMISSION is spot on.

    I have posted a blog on this puzzle here:

    http://cgrishi.wordpress.com/2011/07/09/rama-3/

    Please do visit and, if you like, post any responses.

    This is only an occasional exercise just to see whether my solving skill is intact.

    There is no need to duplicate the Col's blog where our friend regularly posts answers to THC at specified time and where a devoted set of followers enter comments not only on the puzzle but exchange lively memories, opinions, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I do have a suggestion for Col. Is it possible to separate the anno and the solution? It would be helpful later on, when we search the blog to find out if a particular word has been clued before. The intervening braces and asterisks could render such a search impossible.

    ReplyDelete
  10. A good idea. That's what I have done in my blog indicated above. But that will mean more typing for the Col.

    ReplyDelete
  11. 26 - I eat after one - duck? (6) - {I}{O}{DINE}

    The first letter should be in bold italics as this is the definition required - the chemical symbol for Iodine.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi all,
    I am late as I went for the 'International Jawa Day meet' which is held on every 2nd Sunday of Jul. Shall post some snaps in the THCC families site tomorrow.
    Sudalamani, your suggestion is accepted, shall do so from tomorrow, I was also thinking of doing the same after Bhavan did so the last time he stood in for me.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I also go with Sudalamani's anno for REMISSION :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks for the acceptance, Col. And thanks for a detailed blog, CV Sir. Hope we get to do many more tough crosswords in TH that are worthy of such an analysis.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Kishore - Re yesterday's post - It is used to be called 'indoor aeriel', if I remember correctly.

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  16. That's it! I just couldn't recollect the term yesterday.

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  17. The indoor aerial led to an awful lot of sneezing (if you didn't take care to dust) and also served as breeding net for mosquitoes!

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  18. Just an FYI to those considering the latest edition of the Chambers Dictionary: Amazon UK has been offering free shipping to India, for certain products they sell (books, CDs and DVDs -- and only if the total bill comes to more than 25 Pounds). This offer lasts until Aug 15th (the offer was extended to this date, actually). [Details here]

    The Chambers Dictionary is currently available for pre-order for 25.60 Pounds, compared to the 40 the publishers ask, and includes a UK VAT of 20% which we in India need not pay. The price may or may not vary, but they have a policy of charging you the lowest price it attained before release day, if you pre-order it.


    Not-so-fine print:
    Just letting like-minded people know. I'm not affiliated with either Amazon UK or the publishers of the Chambers, and I won't get any perks for posting about the offer here. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Make that "only if the total bill comes to at least 25 Pounds".

    ReplyDelete
  20. Oh, and VAT is not included for books in the UK. Sorry about that.


    Why am I not seeing a delete button beside my comments?

    ReplyDelete
  21. navneethc

    Any idea if the dict is 10th ed or 11th ed? The latter was due to appear soon if it has not already done so. Its jacket is red as usual but the latter has a capital A in light shade with Z in a much bigger font.
    If the 11th edn is obtainable thru this offer I would be interested because the 10th edn itself did not make it to Indian shops and there is no chance of our getting a cheaper Indian edition as no local publisher might want to enter into any fresh arrangement.

    ReplyDelete
  22. It doesn't say which edition it only says releasing on 26 Aug 11 and it has a small 'A' and large 'Z' on the cover and costs 25.60 pounds if you pre-order it now. See it at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chambers-Dictionary-ed/dp/055010237X/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1310301296&sr=8-3

    ReplyDelete
  23. CV,
    Further to the above, I enlarged the picture and it says 12th edition on the cover

    ReplyDelete
  24. Continuing on the subject, I will be joining the Chambers owners gang by Sep as I have ordered it.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Is Chambers a favorite among setters. I recall vaguely when I was very young, and not much into crosswords, a by-line on either the Hindu cw or The Times CW which said 'The compiler uses the Chambers English Dictionary' or words to that effect

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  26. Anax who sets for The Independent, FT and Times has discussed the dictionaries used by the setters for these papers in a recent article at http://www.crosswordunclued.com/2011/06/think-of-letter.html

    He says that The Times favours Collins (for its single-letter abbreviations and headword entries), while The Telegraph relies almost entirely on Chambers. The Sunday Times generously allows most dictionary sources.

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  27. Suresh

    You're correct, a crossword used to have that note but I can't recall exactly which one it was. But certainly not THC.

    Even now some specialist UK crosswords (those using barred grids) have that note.

    I don't think any standard crossword carries that note; it's only a convention that a particular crossword uses a particular dict or dicts.

    Chambers has been hailed as the crossword addict's favourite tool: whatever dict the setter uses, you're sure not to be let down by it. It has Scot, etc words; it gives the senses in which Shakespeare or Spenser used certain words.

    ReplyDelete