Sunday, 30 November 2014

No 2819, Sunday 30 Nov 2014


ACROSS
1   Runs excellent competition (4) RACE {R}{ACE}
3   A theologian is given a couple of degrees in African capital (5,5) ADDIS ABABA {A}{DD}{IS} {A}{BA}{BA}
9   Old robber in bottom flat (7) FOOTPAD {FOOT}{PAD}
11 Captivate some in French Antilles (7) ENCHANT [T]
12 Locum's posting is spurious reveals journalist (6,9) GOSSIP COLUMNIST*
13 Leaves here, perhaps (3,5) TEA CADDY [CD]
14 There's nothing, nothing like an egg (5) OVOID {O}{VOID}
17 The Parisian's left object in lorry (5) ARTIC ARTICle
18 Leaves, describing a ship's journeys (8) PASSAGES {P{A}{SS}AGES}
21 Console and look after one member of the government (7,8) CABINET MINISTER {CABINET} {MINISTER}
23 CD containing lively minor hymn tune (7) CRIMOND {C{MINOR*}D}
24 Last character to leave town in Cornwall in sackcloth and ashes? (7) PENANCE PENzANCE
25 Run away with one chum to find fair (10) LEGITIMATE {LEG IT}{1}{MATE}
26 I spot game (1-3) I-SPY {I}-{SPY}

DOWN
1   Good for son inside to turn down asylum (6) REFUGE REFU(-s+g)GE
2   Platform for Landseer? (5,4) CROW'S NEST [CD] Got this from the answers at Everyman
4   Gathered action involves Italy's leader (7) DEDUCED {DE{DUC}ED} Where did the 'E' go from Duce?
5   In a perfect world, I'd join forces to conserve energy (7) IDEALLY {I'D}{E}{ALLY}
6   Housing agreement (13) ACCOMMODATION [DD]
7   A coaster, one showing violin-maker (5) AMATI {A}{MAT}{1}
8   Gift tied up at resort (8) APTITUDE*
10 Albert, for example, arranged prison concert (6,7) PRINCE CONSORT*
15 Implications, obvious ones (9) OVERTONES {OVERT}{ONES}
16 Female Commander-in-Chief dropped into Asian sea? Absurd (8) FARCICAL {F}{AR{CIC}AL}
18 Crazy to stay over in German city (7) POTSDAM {POTS}{DAM}<=
19 Turned legs on favourite piece (7) SNIPPET {SNIP<=}{PET}
20 Voracious Greek eyed nervously (6) GREEDY {GR}{EYED*}
22 Get bishop on phone (5) BRING {B}{RING}

13 comments:

  1. Jumbo special at 10:30 by Arden.

    ReplyDelete
  2. 25 Run away with one chum to find fair (10) LEGITIMATE {LEG IT}{1}{MATE}

    LEG for ? IT for pl?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Leg it - Walk as per freedic. Can it be applied to run away?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Ram. That's a LEGITIMATE question!

      Delete
  4. Well, we should go by meanings in standard dictionaries but we can't always be too literal.
    Leg it - walk - that's fine.
    But 'leg it' means you use your legs and not any mode of transport, not even cycle. When I use legs, I might amble. When an athletic young man legs it, he might run away before you say Mukundala Balasubramanyam.

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  5. LORRY: 'artic' is short for 'articulated' [lorry].

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No! It is one of those words where the abbr. in itself has become a word by constant use.
      Your bus was once omnibus.

      Delete
  6. But may not before you say Paddy!
    Let us not be too legitimate and give the setter the benefit of doubt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. May your tribe increase Paddy

      Delete
  7. Re DEDUCED. The setter has admitted it's a faulty clue and apologised.
    I sympathise with him because exactly this kind of error happens in other crosswords elsewhere too.
    DEDUCED
    The setter's eye sees it as DE DUCE D
    He thinks he can use this word breakup.
    Next when he sees it he sees it as DE DUC ED
    The resultant clue happens.
    This can be detected only when every clue is carefully worked out before the final draft is produced.
    Not that we don't do it, We do and in this case unluckily it might have been passed over in the checking stage.
    That's where the crossword editor comes.
    When that post is not there, the onus is on the setter.
    Even where a crossword editor is, sometimes error occur in UK crosswords when a last-minute change is made by the setter at the behest of the CE over the phone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only he had worded it as '...French leader' instead.

      Delete