Monday, 14 March 2016

No 11649, Monday 14 Mar 2016, Gridman


ACROSS
1   A  grave  order  to  second-grade  weapon  (4,4) ATOM BOMB {A}{TOM B}{OM}{B}
5   Solvent  ace  has  nothing hidden  in  apartment  (6) AFLOAT {A}{FL{O}AT}
9   Everyone  sailing  is  totally confused  (3,2,3) ALL AT SEA [DD]
10 Not  in  accord  with  old Nicaraguan  rebel  (6) CONTRA [DD]
12 Hold-all's  beginning  to  halt relatives  (4) KITH {KIT}{Halt}
13 Task  of  worker  is  to  go around  messing  about  (10) ASSIGNMENT ANT around {MESSING}*
15 Was  soldier  back  to  begin joining  picture  in  pieces?  (6) JIGSAW {Jo...g}{IG}{SAW}<=
17 Search  for  small  trial  room cut  short  (5) SCOUR {S}{COURt}
20 Well-oiled  Greek  left disburdened  (5) EASED grEASED
21 European  publication  bringing back  some  light  (6) MAGYAR {MAG}{YAR<=}
24 A  piece  for  father's  little  bird?  Too  late  for  that  sort  of  thing (1,3,4,2) A BIT PAST IT {A} {BIT} {PA'S}{T IT}
27 Limitless  cane  for  Indian  flour (4) ATTA rATTAn
29 Endless  dearth  overwhelmed Rajasthan's  premier merchant  (6) TRADER {DEARTh}* over {Ra...n} (Addendum - DEARTh}*{Ra...'s} - See comments)
30 Prose  Sen  composed  elicits rejoinder  (8) RESPONSE*
31 Joint  on  free  movement  (6) REEFER {RE}{FREE*}
32 Educated  ones   almost matter-of-fact  hint  stopped short  (8) LITERATI {LITERAl}{TIp}

DOWN
1   A  learner  faces  question  on  a US  territory  (6) ALASKA {A}{L}{ASK}{A}
2   Concerning  the  dead  in recent  times  (2,4) OF LATE {OF} {LATE}
3   Stakes  by  letting  ace  among Indian  sons  to  leave  (4) BETS BETaS
4   Fulfils  the  requirements  of athletic  events  (5) MEETS [DD]
6   Gone  to  circulate  news  at first  (5) FLOWN {FLOW}{News}
7   John  to  be  trained  so  as  to  be working  (2,3,3) ON THE JOB*
8   Time  ryot  begins  to  cast  farm machines  (8) TRACTORS {T}{Ryots}{ACTORS}
11 Important  person  extensive with  police  officer  (6) BIGWIG {BIG}{W}{IG}
14 Soft  note  lingered  end  to  end (4) MILD {MI}{Li...eD}
16 Prophet  in  South  Africa  gets Indian  delicacy  (6) SAMOSA {S{AMOS}A}
17 A  burst  of  this  might  cause  a wardrobe  malfunction  (4) SNAP [C&DD] (Addendum - SEAM [CD] - See comments)
18 Bad  stratagem:   time-out  for Bollywood  mogul...   (4,4) MEGA-STAR {StRATAGEM}*
19 ... In  the  role  of  criminal:   take  a big  breath  (8) ASPIRATE {AS}{PIRATE}
22 Lines  half-stop  teetotallers going  around  New  Zealand (6) STANZA {STop}{A{NZ}A}
23 Own  incompletely  illumined mansion  (6) HAVELI {HAVE}{LIt}
25 A  bit  calm,   say  (5)  PIECE (~peace)
26 Ancient  tribe  bringing  up some  elephantine  citizens (5) ICENI [T<=]
28 Mistake  drives  many  away from  church  recess  (4) APSE lAPSE


22 comments:

  1. I had entered 17d as SEAM, treating it as a CD. I guess both could fit, although I do think SNAP works better.

    Thank you, Gridman and DG!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Replies
    1. I also took it as SEAM.

      Delete
    2. The compiler's answer is SEAM. The phrase "bursting at the seams" was at the back of the mind.

      Delete
  3. I owe an apology to the organisers and participants of the S&B Meet on the 12th. Given that I had said a tentative yes, it was incumbent on me to change that to a 'no' once I knew I wasn't going to be able to attend. Not being a regular visitor of late has been part of the problem - I didn't realise till it was too late that the last list put up on the blog had my name as a confirmed participant. Sorry, folks!

    ReplyDelete
  4. 29 Endless dearth overwhelmed Rajasthan's premier merchant (6) TRADER {DEARTh}* over {Ra...n}

    I took this to be: {DEART(-h)}*{R}
    Overwhelmed is the anagram indicator

    ReplyDelete
  5. I could get samosas only in 16D, since Magyars & seam deserted me. An enjoyable outing. Thank you GM.
    Felt bad about missing the event on Saturday being a local, but happy to the extent I was able to see the snaps. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Vasi Sir,
    In 18D, why a Bollywood mogul? We have mega star in Tollywood too

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vasi and KKRao: Vasi? Which is the best way to address or refer to any person?

      I read an article about Mrs Sudha Murti today and rpaeatedly she was being refrred to as Murti instead of Sudha or Murthi ! Females have this problem of being addressed by their spouses or father's names , thus being denied their own identity. In these days of unisex references, an actress is also refrred to as an actor. What next? She as a He? Why gender refrences were created ?

      I worte to the press recently on this habit adopted ( not adapted !) from the west by journalists of referring to any name by the surname onky thus denying the person his or mostly her individual identity. Bhagat is refrred to asn Bhagat though ee know of Chetan though his broither is also an author with the name Ketan Bhagat.

      Indians have a unique way of naming and invariably, especially the andhrites get to be known by their first name-- a place of their ancestors or village such as Daguppati or Kolluri etc !

      Comments welcome !

      Delete
    2. Please do ignore typos in my comments; lest someone gets on to my case !

      Delete
  7. Why, we have 'Kollywood'. I used 'Bollywood' because I thought my international audience would be more familiar with that rather than the variants. If I remember right, 'Bollywood' has been used in at least one clue in a UK crossword.
    Incidentally, from what I see now in present-day films, very little shooting is done in any of these woods but rather outdoor -- in excellent spots in our country and abroad.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ah .. seam !! came undone :) I had it as stay..some residual memory of the archaci term "burst your stay laces" - else going was smooth. Thanks CV sir..

    ReplyDelete
  9. ASPIRATE, EASED and HAVELI denied me 16A even though I had answer for it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. So near, yet so far! 24Ac (A BIT PAST IT) was the spoilsport! Yet it was an enjoyable solve. Thank you Gridman.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Could get to the puzzle in the afternoon...there was a halestorm in the morning & lots of mopping up jobs at work...
    Lovely crossword..the 10 letter grid..an enjoyable solve...had put snap instead of seam & missed out on 16 D

    ReplyDelete
  12. Vasnt,
    I think you are still eligible for 16D since that also seems to be an option shared by others!
    You may get into a problem with a CW if you spell it as 'halestorm' in sted of hail ! I had a doubt if I am wrong and writing this after a check. Of late I have run into spelling problems like this in CW's. Maybe it is a typo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paddy it wasnt a typo! A genuine mistake...thanks for the correction

      Delete
  13. Raju.

    Recently a friend of mine had a similar problem of first name and surname while applying for a U.S. visa ( mismatch between passport and visa) It takes time for us to understand the difference between their and our way of addressing. In TN, we have the practice of having the father's name as the initial or surname as they would call it and they naturally get addressed by that name only.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. worse still is the practice in south to have a very looooooooooooong village name as the first name and initial which does not even get filled in the minuscule box, followed by one's father's name and then one's grandfather's name followed by one's family lineage as an Iyer or an Iyengar ! In the process one loses one's own given name and takes on a nickname ( like in my case ¬!) Agony of identity !

      My grouch is on the dropping of the first name by the media and using the surname for either of the genders .

      Delete