Friday, 2 September 2016

No 11793, Friday 02 Sep 2016, Arden


ACROSS
9   Hardly a straight line (7) HALYARD*
10 Married off to one who likes you (7) ADMIRER*
11 Gears cut over and over top spot (7) PINIONS {PIN{1ON}S} <=
12 Financial support almost complete, still sad (7) DOLEFUL {DOLE}{FULl}
13 “The fool will fault the shower”, said Spooner (9) LAMEBRAIN from {(-b)LAME}{(+b)BRAIN}
15 Nothing airy about the language (5) ORIYA {O}{AIRY}*
16 Waiting to start a game (7) SERVICE [DD]
19 Sin a sin involving a Rabbi (7) AVARICE {A}{V{A}{R}ICE}
20 Group for food — changing dimension at the top (5) BUNCH (-l+b)BUNCH
21 To cut a long story short, heart murmurs start here (9) EPICENTRE {EPIc}{CENTRE}
25 Not even three, and a boy's showing signs of disloyalty (7) TREASON {ThReE}{A}{SON}
26 Show struggle for breath, over time (7) PAGEANT {P{AGE}ANT}
28 When our man enters, get a foodie (7) GOURMET {OUR}{M} in {GET}
29 The girl is somewhat supple (7) LISSOME [T] Somewhat on double duty

DOWN
1   Order copy left in a place of worship (6) CHAPEL {CH}{APE}{L}
2   Meeting in multiple numbers (6) PLENUM [T]
3   Writing in Chinese philosophy taking root (4) TARO {TA{R}O}
4   So sad, upset to go around English port (6) ODESSA {SO+SAD}* around {E}
5   Force me — bias is essentially for a flower (8) GARDENIA  {G}{ARDEN}{bIAs}
6   Aviatrix cut short talk to find a remedy (10) AMELIORATE {AMELIa}{ORATE}
7   Lift some of it if fragmented — it's on the wall (8) GRAFFITI [T<=]
8   Framework to interrogate on time (8) GRILLAGE {GRILL}{AGE}
14 Boy's very fit, bit carefree (10) BLITHESOME {B}{LITHE}{SOME}
16 Holy man accepts friar, no bishop will disrupt (8) SABOTAGE {S{ABbOT}AGE}
17 Second growing plant (6-2) RUNNER-UP {RUNNER}-{UP}
18 Picture from here to...perhaps endless (8) ETERNITY [DD]
22 Starts in most places, in the manner of a sprinter (6) IMPALA {In}{Most}{Pl...s}{ALA}
23 Piece of furniture made — pay to acquire log base (6) TEAPOY {E} in {PAY+TO}*
24 Value a point, think about time (6) ESTEEM {E}{S{T}EEM}
27 Essential to cover direction of wind (4) GUST {GU{S}T}

GRID

16 comments:

  1. Print edition was late. So had to do it on line, completing with a few red letters.
    How does 17D work? Runner is plant & growing is up.But how do they change places? In the clue growing comes first.

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  2. Halyard has a nice surface :) Usage of log base in the furniture context for e is kinda clevva too :)thanks for parsing pinions.. had got it only partly.. runnerup is also rather nice ..:) Thanks arden..

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  3. I had 11A Gears cut over and over top spot (7) PINIONS {PIN{1ON}S} <= as
    Gears=Def, Cut= SNIP, over=Rev ind, and over=C/C ind, top spot= No 1

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My view is also the same. I think Col also has intended the same by choosing a single <= indicator.

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    2. Ramesh going by your logic this will become {PIN{NO1}S<=} as you have taken 'and over' as a C/C Ind where is the reversal indicator for NO1

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    3. In our view, first over is snip and second over is top spot

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    4. Then which is the containment indicator?

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    5. Could it be this?
      {NIP<=}{NO1<=}S (CUT OVER = NIP<=, OVER TOP = NO1<=, SPOT = S)

      Delete
  4. Nice puzzle. 13A spoonerism is correct?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see your point. In spoonerism, one may spell one letter instead of the other, that's what I feel. So, this could be rameblain and bamelrain (this is funny!)

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    2. "In spoonerism, one may spell one letter instead of the other, that's what I feel". Could you elaborate please.
      By your contention, how would you explain the following Spoonerisms:
      You've tasted two worms You've wasted two terms
      A half-warmed fish a half-formed wish
      is the bean dizzy? is the Dean busy?

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    3. Thanks Ranger for your point. I have given examples above of what I have felt like a spoonerism ie., error in speech, which we all humans experience when you speak in a hurry or when one is advancing in age.
      What the setters do actually is a deliberate wordplay.
      In my view, such erratic action happens with just one word which should be nearby.

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    4. All said and done, everything depends on how one's tongue twists, defying my feelings!

      Delete
  5. I am generally allergic to spoonerism clues, but I can say this- spoonerism is not just exchange of one or two letters but an exchange of syllables. The common examples given are:

    "Is it kisstomary to cuss the bride?" (as opposed to "customary to kiss")
    "The Lord is a shoving leopard." (instead of "a loving shepherd")

    I hope I have made my point clear.

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